11 July 2016 – What does Brexit mean for Ireland and Europe? with Eamonn McCann

BECAUSE OF THE AMOUNT OF DISCUSSION ON BREXIT, THIS MEETING WILL NOW BE IN THE HAUS DER DEMOKRATIE, GREIFSWALDERSTRAßE 4, STRAßENBAHN AM FRIEDRICHSHAIN

116685218_1280x720Eamonn McCann has been an activist for 50 years, most notably as a young leader of the Civil Rights movement in the North of Ireland. This year, he was voted to elected office for the first time – as a member of the Northern Irish Assembly for the left-wing alliance People Before Profit.

On Monday, 11 July, Eamonn will be in Berlin, and will be speaking at a meeting organised by the LINKE Berlin LAG Internationals. He will be talking about the impact of Brexit on Ireland and Europe (fuller description below).

The meeting will be in English with translation into other languages if required. Everyone is welcome

In 1998, a negotiated settlement produced a new government in Northern Ireland, ending armed conflict. The border that has divided Ireland since 1922 became much more open, allowing an exchange of people, politics and ideas. The EU border will now run through the island of Ireland. Will this bring militarism and new border controls?

There has been no peace dividend in Ireland. Governments North and South have imposed austerity programmes. A new generation of Irish activists has grown up on both sides of the border fighting against corruption, and for sexual freedom. In the South, the privatisation of water has seen 50% of the population refusing to pay charges. Opinion polls show majorities for abortion rights and the unrestricted equality of gay marriage. In both states, old sectarian ideas have started to break down, leading to a number of politicians being elected on socialist platforms.

Britain’s vote to leave the EU could change all this – but how? Will it divide movements on each side of the border? Or, could Brexit lead to Scottish independence and be the first step towards a new united Ireland? How will a post-Brexit internal border affect peace in the region? If “another Europe is possible” what would it look like – in Ireland and here? On July 11, you can discuss such questions with Northern Ireland Assembly member Eamonn McCann.